sirjosh10

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Hey there, and thanks for visiting my blog!

My name is Josh and I use this blog for posting stuff about Halo, Transformers, and various other fandoms. I as well post about art, music, science, history, and of course the usual randomness floating around tumblr.

Personal posts are few and far between, but if you'd like to know more about me, visit my about page.

This blog runs on a queue and is updated daily.


Whom I follow:

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Based on the Nebula theme by Miguel
  1. dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

    dancingspirals:

    ironychan:

    hungrylikethewolfie:

    dduane:

    A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

    (sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

    I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

    Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

    Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

    If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

    Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

    Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

    (Source: wine-loving-vagabond)

  2. 148292 Notes
    Reblogged: fulminata2
  3. superkarissa64:

    slimmerboo:

    marcelinedrawsooo:

    I stumbled upon a website that allows you to blend any colors evenly no matter how opposite on the spectrum they are.

    sharing the knowledge

    image

    very helpful art resource

    WHERE HAS THIS BEEN ALL MY LIFE???

    (Source: sketchcomplex)

  4. 224700 Notes
    Reblogged: zohbugg
  5. ldfb:

    Taken from the Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind: Watercolor Impressions artbook. 

    The artbook contains original works by Miyazaki himself, spanning the many years of the manga’s production, as well as the making of the film. The book contains full page,  vivid illustrations that include manga covers.

    You can purchase the hardcover version for around $25 on amazon.

  6. 1345 Notes
    Reblogged: ldfb

    You sit there in your heartache
    Waiting on some beautiful boy to
    To save you from your old ways

    (Source: geneticandunattainable)

    69955 Notes
    Reblogged: fulminata2

    lullabyingsweetnothings:

    John Denver - Take Me Home, Country Roads

    I hear her voice
    In the mornin’ hour she calls me
    The radio reminds me of my home far away
    And drivin’ down the road I get a feelin’
    That I should have been home yesterday, yesterday

    92 Notes
    Reblogged: fulminata2
  7. mercedeslezzies:

    I think this speaks for itself. Accepting a person doesn’t mean you get to put limits on their freedom. You can’t be an ally and want us to stop talking, or labeling, or demanding to be heard.  

    Acceptance has no exceptions. Period. 

  8. 69298 Notes
    Reblogged: blueknowledge
  9. softwaring:

Sunrise over Towers of Paine
Patagonia, Chile
Frances Kwok

    softwaring:

    Sunrise over Towers of Paine

    Patagonia, Chile

    Frances Kwok

  10. 43701 Notes
    Reblogged: chelonaut
  11. ritasv:

DSC_0268 by Nobuhiro Miyake

    ritasv:

    DSC_0268 by Nobuhiro Miyake

    (Source: flickr.com)

  12. 29 Notes
    Reblogged: fulminata2

    song-masher:

    Mash-up of 

    • One Direction Last First Kiss (vocals)
    • 5 Seconds of Summer She Looks So Perfect (instrumental)

    Requested by : beyniall

    Download here

    By Song-Masher - Downloads - Request a Mash-up!

    Last First Kiss © 2012 Columbia Records, Syco MusicShe Looks So Perfect © 2014 Capitol Records, Hi or Hey.  My mash-ups are transformative works and are protected by the DMCA’s fair-use doctrine.

    1287 Notes
    Reblogged: song-masher
  13. emmawatsonsdaily:

    One of the reasons why Emma Watson is one of the best female role-models of our time. She’s so underrated.

  14. 389802 Notes
    Reblogged: chelonaut
  15. breakfastburritoe:

ordon-village:

stunningpicture:

Lobster in a bucket looks like a gigantic monster on a metallic planet, and the waterdrops look like stars.

This is transcendental. 

THIS FUCKED ME UP FOR 3 DAYS

    breakfastburritoe:

    ordon-village:

    stunningpicture:

    Lobster in a bucket looks like a gigantic monster on a metallic planet, and the waterdrops look like stars.

    This is transcendental. 

    THIS FUCKED ME UP FOR 3 DAYS

  16. 328360 Notes
    Reblogged: zohbugg
  17. memefuckery:

    intellectualpizza:

    memefuckery:

    I had a hermit crab and a dollhouse…..

    SWEET BABY JESUS I THOUGHT IT WAS A NORMAL HOUSE AND YOU HAD SOME SORT OF HUGE ASS CRUSTACEAN LIVING IN IT AND I ALMOST PASSED OUT

    It’s okay, like 12 other people thought that

  18. 110025 Notes
    Reblogged: fulminata2
  19. anaeolist:

    star trek/treasure planet au god help me

  20. 20660 Notes
    Reblogged: fulminata2
  21. hausofdirectioners:

on a scale from 1 to Samsung how much do you hate Apple?

    hausofdirectioners:

    on a scale from 1 to Samsung how much do you hate Apple?

    (Source: kingoftheniall)

  22. 285072 Notes
    Reblogged: zohbugg
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